Monthly Archives: December 2018

Sea Level Rise: U.S. East Coast (III)

I’ll alter course in my cursory look at four regions of the U.S. east coast (we already looked at New England) to comment on a few things mentioned in comments.

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Sea Level Rise: U.S. East Coast (II)

In the last post I defined the four regions of the U.S. east coast for which I’ve created a regional sea level estimate (since 1950). Northernmost is my New England (NE) region, which includes the coasts of Rhode Island and Connecticut, even the tip of Long Island:

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Sea Level Rise: U.S. East Coast (I)

A new paper by Piecuch et al. looks at how sea level rise has differed from place to place along the east coast of the U.S. There’s a nice write-up about it in Science Magazine.

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Freezy Hot Climate Change

Temperature varies, through day and night, from day to day, from month to month, and year to year. The most common way to note its changes is to record each day’s high temperature and low temperature, which has been done at Kremsmuenster, Austria since 1876. Here’s a snapshot of five years of that data, from 2010 through 2014:

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Global Warming’s Pretend Pause

A new paper by Risbey et al. examines the so-called “pause” in global temperature, and demonstrates convincingly that it wasn’t a real phenomenon, it was just random fluctuation that can look like a pause all along. I’ve been saying this for some time now. I’m also a co-author on the paper.

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Arctic Hockey

I’ve been studying how temperature has changed over the years in the Arctic. The longest record I’ve got is for land areas only, from the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project, which starts way back in 1750:

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‘Tis the Season for Sea Ice

The news lately is replete with mentions of sea ice, because NOAA’s Arctic Report Card features it prominently, mentioning that “In 2018 Arctic sea ice remained younger, thinner, and covered less area than in the past. The 12 lowest extents in the satellite record have occurred in the last 12 years.” It also emphasizes how the loss of Arctic sea ice is but the start of a chain of events leading to dramatic change both in the Arctic and elsewhere.

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